Archive for the ‘Peter Trombetti’ Category

Stories are often told of the “older generation” that walked into a job after college and were still with the same company 30 years later. These tales are often told with a shaking of the head and a comment or two about how those days are behind us. Between the economy and a millennial generation who is used to having instant gratification, the days of an employee being able to count on a long term position, and conversely, a company being able to count on loyal employees, are over. Or so we thought.

When you actually take a look at some of the current data out there about job searchers, you would find the opposite is actually true. Current studies by the Washington Post show that in the past decade, young employees are actually staying at their jobs longer than any other time since 1983. See graph below:

recruiting and human resources

So what is really going on? This takes us back to the simple answer of: the economy. This generation came of age in a time when jobs were not readily available and the competition was fierce. Many were competing with seasoned employees who had years of work experience that they didn’t have. When they did find a job, they held on tightly because there wasn’t another one readily available around the corner.

However, the good news for both employees and employers alike, is that as the economy is expected to improve, the job market is as well. Companies will be in a better position to offer higher salaries and more benefits to potential employees. Hiring managers will begin to see more competitive employees enter the job market as they see conditions improve, while workers can expect more variety and better wages in their future.

Peter Trombetti founded The Oficio Group in 2007. As a managing partner, he handles various areas of business, including sales, recruitment, and strategic development. Outside of work, Peter Trombetti enjoys reading The Wall Street Journal.

Earlier in the year, The Huffington Post listed the 10 most circulated newspapers in the United States. The list, which named USA Today and The New York Times, was led by The Wall Street Journal. The Wall Street Journal had 2.37 million copies in circulation every week at that time. This total included more than 800,000 digital copies of the publication.

Several months later in May, when the nation’s average newspaper circulation numbers had fallen for the sixth consecutive month, circulation at The Wall Street Journal had increased to just about 2.4 million copies, with nearly 900,000 digital copies moved every week. The figure represented a 12 percent increase from the same time last year.

A relatively new water sport, kiteboarding combines elements of snowboarding, skateboarding, windsurfing, wakeboarding, and kite flying. By using special kites, kiteboarders can maneuver their boards through the water and air, as well as over the land. As the managing partner of Oficio Group, company founder Peter Trombetti oversees all aspects of the organization’s business development, recruitment, and sales. Outside of work, Peter Trombetti maintains an active lifestyle that includes a recent foray into kiteboarding.

Since kiteboarding requires the ability to handle and maneuver a kite, kite flying on land in moderate winds is often an initial step for learning how to do it. After familiarization with a kite on land, aspiring kiteboarders can acquaint themselves with basic maneuvers along the beach and within the water. Practicing how to skid on the beach under the power of a kiteboarding kite serves as a good way to learn balance while experiencing the kite’s force. Allowing a kite to pull one across the water enables him to learn how to control it, should he fall off his board in the water.

Once the basics are learned, beginners must become accustomed to flying with a harness before finally moving into the water to practice things like maintaining speed and travelling upwind, let alone tricks. It is typically suggested that people who are new to kiteboarding take lessons from qualified instructors. It is also important that beginners not rush into the water. Learning the proper drills on land will help elevate the level of kite control precision and accelerate learning within the water.